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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  May 20, 2011 6:00am-9:00am EDT

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at the top of the show, which seems like an hour and a half you awake? alex has the answer. >> hey, willie. you seem a bit more mature this morning. >> roland, thanks very much. how are things on rikers island for you. god almighty, i seem much more mature. thanks, rob. guess what time it is. what are you laughing at? "morning joe" starts right now. >> the borders of israel and palestine should be based on the 1967 lines with mutually agreed swaps so that secure and recognized borders are established for both states.
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the palestinian people must have the right to govern themselves, reach their full potential in a sovereign and contiguous state. >> welcome to "morning joe." great to have you here, this beautiful friday morning. i say it's beautiful because you can actually see how miserable it is out there from the top of the rock, unlike yesterday, where you could see about two or three feet. breaking news, we may have sun this weekend, we may. it's friday, may 20th. with us on set, msnbc contributor, mike barnicle, also former governor of pennsylvania and msnbc news political analyst, ed rendell and financier and msnbc analyst, steve rattner and richard haass. >> i want to make sure you didn't walk in front of that camera like john mccain in a debate. the sox, can you believe the sox?
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>> carl crawford, this year's mvp of the american league. look at the governor. >> every hit wins a game. >> they couldn't find it in the fog. >> i know. just miserable. so, richard haass, thank you for coming on set yesterday. we called you obviously after the speech yesterday. and wanted to get you in here because the president -- i'll let you characterize what the president did yesterday regarding israel and pre-1967 borders. >> he used formulations that had never been precisely used before. he said things explicitly that people knew implicitly, so you can either approach this one of two ways, you can do a tectal and look at every word and say what's different, what did he say? what didn't he say? what's slightly new and all that? what's good for israelis and palestinians, one way to approach it. the other is to take a step back and say how much of this
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reaction to the speech is not about the speech, about what came before the speech and about the relationship. i think that's actually closer to the truth. there were new things the israelis didn't like some of what they heard, probably palestinians didn't like what they didn't here, one of those speeches do much for some and not enough for others. we can go into this if you want. a lot is about a relationship that has never quite gelled between netanyahu and president obama. and netanyahu meets with the president in a couple of hours. they weren't hoping for this, weren't expecting it. found out about it the day before, pushed back, they didn't get what they want, what you have is a relationship that is meant to be built on trust and it's not quite there. that explains some of the vitriol in the statement that came out from the prime minister in his office hours after the speech, which was an angry statement. to put it bluntly, netanyahu had
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a choice, could have cherry picked those parts of the speech he liked, particularly the parts that challenged fatah and the palestinians, how are you a credible negotiating partner because hamas rejects the existence of the state of israel so israelis raise the question how you're a legitimate partner. he could have emphasized that and in his response chose not to and went through the speech of all the things that gave him heartburn. it's hard to imagine a worse meeting to today's meeting. >> i have to say, governor, when you start at what most people would consider the finishing point and you tell the palestinians we're going to give you back everything you lost in 1967, when israel was attacked, i just don't see the upside for israel here. >> it's not a very good negotiating strategy.
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what i think the president was trying to do was inject some life into the negotiations and trying to take advantage of the wave of feeling going across the arab world right now. was it a good bargaining strategy, you're right, joe, probably not. >> what else does the president have? what do the israelis have to give up? again, i don't think, as richard said, i don't think this as an end point for middle east negotiations would shock a lot of for ren policy experts, beginning point for u.s. foreign policy, to state it official u.s. foreign policy. i'm sorry, that's shocking me. >> i disagree with you. i think you're slightly overdoing it. we all know at the end of the day, if there's an agreement, there's going to be two states, a jewish state called israel, a palestinian state next to it. the idea it's based on the '67 lines with land swaps for two reason, security reasons, have to be adjustments in this border to take into account legitimate
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israel security concerns and demographic regions to take into account the three large settlement blocks blown up over the last several decades. the negotiations will before over -- >> you think i'm doing it saying 1967 is not politically feasible, by saying no vouchers, excuse me. >> no. that's not the basis, not saying you go back to the '67 lines no stop, that would be the '67 line with land swaps. that's what negotiations are about. not arguing that, formulations in the middle east and symbolic particularly in the context of a relationship that's not good. he said explicitly what everybody has argued implicitly, which is that you will have a negotiations that's the framing point and the detail and details matter. the details is where you go from
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there. >> richard, it's a little bit like a labor negotiations. if you're the government, you don't come in and say to the union, this is what we want, and have that as the actual thing that you want, you have to set the stage and leave wiggle room. if this was an eventual negotiated settlement, maybe it's a good place to be. i think your point, joe, if you want to start negotiations, you start in a way that leaves you room to grow. >> what have the palestinians done, steve rattner, over the past eight years to deserve the president of the united states moving this quickly other than elect hamas as their leader? >> i think you just said it, the palestinians have gone in the wrong direction, not the right direction. >> why are we rewarding them for going in the wrong direction? >> i'm a little bit with these guys, what the president said has been implicit, a starting point, not ending point in terms of the '67 borders and land
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swaps. there's a lot going on in the middle east. i think the president felt the need say something constructive that would help us in a broader way, not just these negotiations but the rests of the arab country around the middle east, the second thing that struck me to bring it home to america, it's remarkable the president got up at this point close to an election year and made a speech which is not going to be well received with the american jewish community with whom he's already not in good favor going back to '08 at a time he's trying to raise a billion, i do give him credit for standing up and saying that. >> it's what he did in 2008. let's look at this 2008 speech the president delivered to aipac. >> our alliance is based on shared interests and shared values. those who threaten israel threaten us. israel has always faced these threats to the front lines. i will bring to the white house an unshakable commitment to
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israel security. let me be clear, israel security is sacrosanct. it is non-negotiable. the palestinians need a state -- the palestinians need a state that is contiguous and cohesive and that allows them to prosper. but any agreement with the palestinian people must preserve israel's identity as a jewish state with secure recognized defensible borders. and jerusalem will remain the capital of israel and it must remain undivided. >> wait, mark barnicle, he didn't do that when he went to aipa krrkc in 2008. he sounded a bit like mort zuckerman. less like brzezinski and more like mort zuckerman. >> it appears in rereading the speech last night. the speech is the bush doctrine with verbs, not that dissimilar from the bush doctrine set out
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by president bush years ago. he gives the speech in the context of a new middle east, a new north africa and he's a different president. he's not george w. bush. we've been emphasizing whether he has thrown too much on the table, given too much on the table before he even starts negotiating, but if you again go over the speech again, there's a strong and explicit warning to hamas and fatah. you know, they are n not -- israelis are not going to negotiate with you until and unless you recognize their right to exist, if you don't do that, there's no process. >> right. >> he's trying to jump-start a process that doesn't exist. >> he's not so much trying to jump-start a process, quite honestly, i think there's no pr chance the process will get started now, he's trying to head off a train wreck this september in the u.n. he wants to put down this challenge to hamas and fatah and essentially put something out
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there, so people don't jam israel in the general assembly this september. the large issue, you're getting at, why did he give this speech now? yes, to do that, i'm not sure this was good idea, not sure it made a lot of sense. in the so-called arab people, israel has not been front and center, why introduce this issue so frontally now, particularly in a context where there's probably not a lot you can do. >> we talked about this on the show repeatedly, one of the striking things about the middle east, if you haven't seen american flags burning, you haven't seen israel flags burning, i don't think this is necessary when the president already has such bad standing with the israeli people and prime minister, i don't know how this moves the peace process forward, i think it strengthens the hard liners hand in israel and netanyahu's hand. he has made a political enemy of netanyahu, and that's not going to change. >> that's the tactic of the
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speech opposed to the linear analysis. that's a legitimate question, particularly when the arabs read the speech, said, hey, where's the process? george mitchell resigned. >> why did george mitchell resign? because this was coming? >> the word on the street he resigned not because he thought it was too much, too little. the backdrop is for months there was been a battle between the administration how much was put on the record and they wanted the president to put on the record a full flenched middle east plan, a framework agreement. what you got yesterday was the half monty, not the full monty. mitchell reportedly wanted more than this and after the hamas, fatah agreement, this is all the president was willing to do. >> you know, one of the more interesting elements of this, underlying element, there is a hint within the speech of perhaps a martial plan for north
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africa and the middle east, basically the president saying, we'd like to do this with the europeans and the united states but we don't have a lot of money to do it, kind of interesting subplot. >> to forgive a billion in debt when the country is $25 billion in debt. it's a modest amount, connects to a lot of conversations we have around this table -- >> about our own fiscal situation. >> it's hard to be a great power. >> before we move to break, let's go to another part of the speech, the president called out friend and foe alike, whether it was syria, or yemen, or bahrain, certainly -- stayed away from the saudis but the saudis certainly weren't happy when he started talking about bahrain. i would guess the uae and other countries on the peninsula weren't happy as well. >> i think the president was under a lot of pressure to articulate his vision for this region. i think that is part of the
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speech. the israeli part got the most attention and most substantive. it was at the end of the speech and a lot of stuff before that he tried to lay out his vision. when you cut through it, his vision was pragmatic, you have to pick your shots, take each country case by case, you can make arguments all you want about syria being this or that but you have to deal in the real world what's possible. i think he was trying to work his way through that as carefully as he could. >> let's talk to politics, attacking the president for what he said if i were on the campaign trail, i would do the same thing and not for political reasons just because there are a lot of people, certainly over the past decade, at least since 2000 that have said what have the palestinians done? what risks have the palestinians taken for peace? why are we pushing the israelis more in the corner? let's talk the political impact of this speech, if you were on the campaign trail in philadelphia, would you be
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putting your arms around barack obama with this speech? >> no. that's the curious part. if we're close to closure, you can say take the political risk and sometimes you have to do what's right above and beyond politics. i'll never forget in 2008, aipac convention was in philadelphia two days before the primary. i got to speak as governor and brought a guest along with me, hillary clinton, she wasn't allowed to speak and i recognized her. the place went absolutely wild. in part, pro hillary, but in part somewhat -- >> the fear of barack obama. >> i think as we enter an election cycle, it's a ve very -- the president, as you said deserves credit for doing this, but why now when there doesn't appear to be chance for closure. >> i don't see this moving us closer to peace. i see this actually cornering the israelis more and making peace, at least in the short term more unlikely. >> i think it goes back a little
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bit to what richard said. israelis are under increasing pressure around the world, you have this vote from the general assembly coming up in the fall and the president felt he had to do something to establish a line of last defense. >> can you think of any european ally. maybe any president will be proven right here, he knows and awful lot more than i do right now behind the scenes talking to allies, does this move a european ally to our side if we veto the u.n. resolution this fall? >> the timing of this is also linked to the president's forthcoming trip to europe and g8 meetings and hoping this would strengthen their hand. again, i think it will not be enough for them and obviously too much with the israelis. that's the problem with halfway houses. >> very good. still ahead this morning, former national security advisor, dr. brzezinski. can't wait to hear what he has to say. i will be off the set and let mika take that.
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moderator of "meet the press." david gregory will be here and senator mark kirk. later, if it's friday, it's willie's weekend in review. first, time for the weather forecast. debbie downer, also known as bill karins for a check of this weekend's forecast. please tell me, i see green on the map. please tell me, we will see the sun this weekend on the east coast. >> we will see it but not all the time. this is the tenth morning in a row we have seen rain. central pennsylvania is not a pretty place right now with rain and cloudy conditions. state college and now some is trying to make its way down and a miss her weather week is now over the top of scranton. we will see sun just like yesterday and later this afternoon, a chance of rain. keep the umbrella and maybe even
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sunglasses. be prepared for anything. very strong line of thunderstorms rolling through. forecast very stormy today. that continues into your saturday, where all the bad weather will be. it will warm up on the east coast. new york city near 80 on saturday. we are rewarded for a nice weekend after what was painful painful spring week. hopefully we turned the corner and won't be reliving this any time soon. ♪ ♪ one, two, three, four ♪ want you and everything that you do...do ♪ ♪ it's obvious that i like you ♪ i'd go anywhere to be near you ♪ ♪ you say ♪ flip it over and replay ♪ we'll make everything okay
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♪ walk together the right way ♪ do,o, do, do... ♪ i can't sleep ♪ do, do, do, do ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪
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as recently as five years ago, gingrich carried debt up to $500,000 with tiffany and company in new york, one of the premie premiere jewelers. >> $500,000?
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a simple explanation. the guy buys jewelry in bulk. >> you have been call the brilliant one of congress. i have also heard you have six-pack abc, is that true, congressman? >> well -- >> it's a simple question. do you or do you not have six-pack abs. >> as soon as i say that, and get out of shape, you will -- >> you are implying i'm so taken with you, i will stay obsessed with your abs, sir, yes, i'm not saying there's no chemistry here. i'm saying i'm keeping this professional, all right, and that you do the same, all right? >> got you. >> let's look at the morning papers, "wall street journal" this week. lincoln inn -- linkedin. >> remember him?
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the 16th president. >> linkedin, they were having a debate yesterday whether this was a relevant website or not. the largest ipo debut since google in 2004, doubling its shares. experts say this sets the stage for other internet based companies to become public. when people give you irritating requests and you say, leave me alone. >> want to join iron n my busin venture. >> that's where i will find business partners on the internet, linkedin, lincoln logs. >> in the deadliest coal mine disaster in 40 years, they say massey mine was responsible for the explosion that killed 20 men last year and that safety was ignored and it was avoidable.
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and mcdonald's leader has ronald's back. a shocking story someone was blaming ronald mcdonald for unhealthy eating. the fast chain ceo is supporting ronald and saying people can eat whatever the hell they want, take that, mika. >> yeah, the clown made me fat. an engineer turned biblical scholar, judgment day is this saturday morning, making tomorrow the end of the world! his teaching say those who believed will be absorbed into heaven while unbelievers will be left to perish and there will be no "morning joe" on monday. okay. yeah, we won't be teasing monday's show. let's bring in the chief white house correspondent from "politico," mike allen, here with the morning playbook. happy friday, mike. >> happy friday to you. >> you have your hands on a hot
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new ad by democrats. tell us about it. >> we do. but i don't know if this is related to the end of the world, i have to congratulate chris licht on creating this amazing morning conversation and alex for picking up the torch and big week for chris next week, this amazing book i read last night, what i learned when i almost died. joe, my favorite scene in there is when chris, apparently the icu doesn't have msnbc there to fix that. so chris was listening in to your white house correspondents association special from the white house lawn on the speakerphone because he couldn't get msnbc. >> good thing his near death experience disconnecting from his work 24-7. he kept going. mike, he claims he put down his blackberry and started living life. i haven't seen that yet. i think he's just -- >> it's a metaphor.
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>> it's a metaphor. very good. not very -- yeah, congratulations to chris. we will talk about that more later on and condolences to alex, his life will soon be a living and breathing hell. tell us about this democratic ad. >> joe, this is from priority usa, the super pack by democrats to counter american crossroads by karl rove and the one bill burton helped start and paul begala will be out there for them today. their first ad is hitting heavy in south carolina ahead of a mitt romney visit, they say if you watch the news in south carolina this week, you'll see it. here's a little clip. >> newt gingrich says a republican plan that would essentially end medicare is too radical. governor haley thinks the plan is courageous and gingrich shouldn't be cutting conservatives off at the knees. mitt romney says he's on the
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same page as paul ryan who wrote the plan to end medicare. with mitt romney, you have to wonder, which page is he on today? priorities usa action responsible for the content of this advertisement. >> all right. mike, it looks like democrats have decided they will be running against mitt romney. >> i agree with you. the headline to me was that's where they're focusing and right away, they're honing in on two issues we will see again and again. they're going hard right away at the top on the flip-flop issue with mitt romney and they want to keep promoting this medicare plan as the gift that keeps on giving. they want to put every candidate on the record on this. how close will you get to paul ryan? not very close. just yesterday, we saw john huntsman also keeping his distance. >> governor, we used to say in the '90s, social security was the third rail of american politics. that's moved over to medicare, hasn't it? >> sure.
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moved over only in the sense, joe, the plan absolutely replaces medicare with a voucher program. >> i know. but democrats -- democrats touch medicare in 2009, they lose in 2010 because of it. now, democrats are using meh mehdi -- medi-scare to beat republicans. >> i'm not sure we lost in 2010 because we touched medicare and the obama health care plan. there was more to it. sure, what really is instructive here, we're trying to knock out tore this group is trying to knock out mitt romney in the primaries. we don't want to face mitt romney. a romney pawlenty ticket, i said it before is the most credible general election ticket. >> of the team they have on the field now by far, i would worry the most about mitt romney. >> team him up with tim pawlenty. >> you suddenly have a massachusetts and minnesota guy. >> no. you have a 16 rational guy. he flip-flopped, not perfect but
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compared to the rest of these people, he's a 16 rational person. >> yeah. that's the -- you put that on the bumper, not as crazy as the rest of them. romney, 2012. >> we don't want to face him in the general. >> a friend of mine from new hampshire was talking to him last night, huntsman had a pretty big day in new hampshire yesterday, big crowds, very attractive. >> a huge problem to overcome, people don't think you should run against your boss. if you worked for the guy for two years, how can you say he's bad. >> it's unseemly. >> take that note, chris licht. mike allen, thank you so much. >> bon voyage, chris. >> we'll talk to you soon. coming up next, the reaction from the middle east on president obama's major address yesterday. richard engel will join us from cairo. plus, don't look now, but the boston red sox, they just can't -- they can't lose. >> the little engine that could. >> i think i can. they keep going up that big
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mountain. we'll tell you what they did last night. full highlights of the remarkable win when we return.
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efforts to broaden our engagement beyond elites so that we reach the people who will shape the future. particularly, young people. we will continue to make good on the commitments that i made -- >> thank you, t.j. welcome back. with us now from cairo, egypt's msnbc -- cairo, egypt, msnbc's for ren correspondent, richard engel, obviously, a lot of talks in the united states domestically and politically about the president's comments yesterday. what is the reaction across the middle east and, of course, in cairo, where the president gave a remarkable speech in 2009 on the future of the middle east? >> reporter: the reaction was very different to the speech he gave in 2009. in 2009, president obama practically became an egyptian citizen. people loved that speech. there were people that went out in the streets and felt that finally a u.s. president understands the region.
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this time, a very different reaction. a lot of people in cairo didn't watch it and those that did watch it didn't think it went far enough. the president's speech was really broken up into two parts. the first half, first three quarters really was about talking about embracing reform movements and arab spring and punishing regimes like libya and syria cracking down on demonstrators. people thought that was good across the middle east, even in israel, people thought that was a welcome position from the u.s. president and president obama because of libya and because of new sanctions on syria has the credibility to make statements like that. the last section of his speech, however, wa on the israel-palestinian complex and people in this part of the arab world didn't think it went nearly far enough. they wanted the president to personally commit to restarting peace talks between israelis and palestinianst th palestinians, they thought they had heard many times before talk about the 1967 borders. obviously in israel any talk of
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1967 was a redline because 1967 would mean giving back potentially east jerusalem the vast majority of israelis do not want to do. >> we have richard haass, the entightened richard haass, president of the council on for ren relations here. has a couple of questions. >> is it your sense the economic portion of the speech obviously meant as a gesture to the egyptians would make any difference and how was that received? >> reporter: actually, it was received with a lot of skepticism. you would think a billion in forgiven loans and a billion dollars in loan guarantees would be widely embraced in a country facing economic difficulties. people thought, well, that's great. we want to hear more, more about justice, more about the palestinians. it was almost swept under the -- swept in with the mix of the rest of the speech. i would have thought there would have been a stronger statement or statement of appreciation from that. i get a billion dollars nowadays
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doesn't buy what it used to. >> okay, richard. thank you so much for being with us from cairo. remarkable events continue to unfold on the ground. thank you for your remarkable reporting there. before we get to sports, a lot of e-mails coming in to you talking about how enlightened you are. >> i think the speech- >> you can just agree. very easy to kick the guy around that supports israel. easy to feel good about themselves when they trash israel. >> again, this speech is not a trashing of israel. what's so interesting again -- >> wasn't saying the president was trashing -- i was talking about the people e-mailing you. it's always -- intellectuals for some reason and academics have always related to the palestinian cause. it doesn't really matter what the palestinians do. they can blow up whomever they want to blow up, they can elect
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hamas, when given an opportunity to move forward, they can take one chance after another to recognize the state of israel and their right to exist and they will not do it. yet american presidents in a tluslusty quest for a nobel pea prize, this president already has it, will throw israel under the bus every time asham mass moves forward. >> israelis move toward peace as a favor to themselves. you want it to be secure, a jewish state and prosperous state and want it to be a democracy. at the end of the day, israel needs peace as a favor to itself, not the palestinians. the question is, how do you get this going, this status quo is not good for israel or the palestinians. again, i would not have given the speech the president gave yesterday or given this precise
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speech any day. it's now been essentially four decades since the '67 war which defines the modern middle east. the trajectory we're on is not good for anybody. >> let's be clear here. i think most of us agree, any peace process we suspect would end with the '67 borders being the outline, i agree with that and agree the israelis have to make tough concessions. i'm not saying the israel israelis -- because that's in their best interest. again, ed, as we've been saying here, i don't know that backing the israelis into a corner like this moves the peace process forward. that is my bottom line. >> i agree with that. i also think there has to be consequences for bad actions. as you said at the beginning, the palestinians, hamas, they haven't done anything to justify us moving in their direction. it's clear, richard, richard's point is right.
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i i'm a jew and i believe israel must reach peace, the only chance they have for long term economic and other survival and has to be some form of negotiated settlement. if you don't have consequences for bad actions, they will never change. >> they have elected, mike, a group that will not recognize israel's right to exist, a group who continues to say, their goal is to drive israel into the sea. this ain't nothing. why is it that the united states continue demanding concessions from israel when the elected palestinian leadership will not recognize israel's right to even exist? >> i think one of the key points most people have, most ordinary people have, when it comes to this, now decades long conflict without any resolution is how do you sit and negotiate across the table with people who are sworn to eliminate you? how do you do that? >> how do you negotiate, steve rattner, let's make this contemporary, how do you
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negotiate with people who just two weeks ago, condemned the united states for the killing of osama bin laden? >> i don't disagree with anything you're saying, just to look at it from the president's perspective for a second, it is a requirement under his speech they recognize the right of israel to exist. the palestinian state would be demilitarized, whatever that means. that hasn't been negotiated yet. the -- israel has been -- there was no push on israel about east jerusalem, about the settlements, things like that, all part of this land swap idea. i think the president is trying, i'm just putting myself in the issues, he's trying to move the ball forward, as ed and richard both said, it's been four decade, you have to get to the end of this somehow and he's trying to start and inch this thing along. >> don't you think the optics, the president is smart enough to know what the optics of the speech is. >> i think the optics are terrible and the speech is bizarre, i agree with what
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you're saying but in an odd way, maybe the president is trying to get something going. >> this isn't a leading question. is backing israel into the corner a possible strategy of this president. as history has shown, is that how carter got what he wanted in '78, how dr. brzezinski was able to negotiate with began in '78? >> backing israel into a corner is not the answer particularly when you don't have a palestinian partner. the question is whether this helps you avoid a train wreck in the u.n. in september. i think that has a lot to do with it. i don't think tactically or strategically this was the right speech to give at this time. >> i think that's where most of us are. except barnicle. barnicle just wants to talk about the red sox. we'll let him do that next
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break. we have moderator of "meet the press," david gregory and columnist for the "washington post," eugene robinson and willie's week in review. keep it here on "morning joe," brewed by starbucks. hi, this other store has these for 20 cents less. what?! -match it! -match it! -match it! -match it! -match it! -match it! -match it! -match it! -match it! -match it! -[ horn honks ] -match it! thank you, got it. i'll match that price right here. cool. [ male announcer ] we won't be beat. we have low prices every day.
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welcome back to "morning joe." let's go to sports with mike barnicle at the red sox desk. >> red sox-tigers in foggy fenway, red sox have a 3-1 lead in the eighth. i have this guy on my fantasy team, gives up back to back runs to miguel cabrera. they tie it at three. bottom of the ninth. lowery, shallow left.
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andy comes up firing. forced play. not over. the game is not over. still tied until carl crawford, next batter, line drive over the center field's head, sox win, 4-3. >> how's beckett doing? >> did great last night. out of the game with a stiff neck but okay. >> what about dice-k? he is on the disabled list hopefully a year and a half. >> what's the yankees score? >> yankees did win. i shut it off, they were like 11-0. they were hammering? the yankees and red sox have had a great week. >> yeah. >> both those teams coming off that series. >> did you hear about this story? lance armstrong? >> "60 minutes" will finish him. >> he was accused of doping by one of his better friends on his cycling team. this is just a continuation of charges that have been made against lance armstrong.
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unproven but "60 minutes" this weekend documents it, according to lance's teammate. this is not good. >> just one after another, the dominos continue to fall, steve rattner. >> it's so sad, all these heroes who turn out not to be what you thought they were. >> i know. like barry bonds, he was always my hero. >> never saw that coming. >> i know. >> hat size went from 7 to 12 in about a year. >> exactly. >> thank god we never did that on the red sox. >> that's exactly right, joe, keep it up. i like that. >> nobody's head exploded. so, is he guilty? is lance guilty? do most insiders think lance is guilty of doping? >> i am told that most insiders in that industry, that sport think yes. >> but don't they drug test in france? >> they do now.
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>> they did for several years he participated. >> but i think early on, there was no -- i'm not sure, i think there was no testing for several years. >> certainly for several years he participated, they drug tested. >> yeah. i don't know what drugs they tested for, though. >> all right. coming up next, willie's week in review. keep it here on "morning joe." ♪ [ male announcer ] in 2011, at&t is at work, building up our wireless network all across america. we're adding new cell sites... increasing network capacity, and investing billions of dollars to improve your wireless network experience.
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while all of you are aware of this, joe pointed this out to me willie will not be here today because tonight is his senior prom because he has the day off. he did send in his homework. here are his top stories of the week. >> nowadays, we all know cash rules everything around us, kareem, get the money, dollar dollar bill, y'all. >> number three, cash rules everything around her. ♪ >> in a speech this week before the illinois legislature about the state's $15 billion budget shortfall, senate minority leader christine radogno quoted ray quan. >> last night, raeknown from the
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wu-tang was in town. >> they ruled out the governing philosophy, creme or cash rules everything around me. ♪ dollar dollar bill, yo. >> sure, the fellows were talking about drug dealing on the streets of new york but the core message also applies to state budgets from sacramento to springfield. >> nowadays we all know cash rules everything around us, creme, get the money, dollar dollar bill, y'all. thank you. >> number two, soccer players using their hands. the world's game was on display in mexico this week, when a fan wandered onto the field looking for a shanhand shake and found himself in the middle of a mob scene with guys wearing shin guards. the low light of the brawl was a wwe head cut from the goalkeeper to the grill of the other team's
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assistant coach, ah, the beautiful game. and the number one story of the week. >> i made a mistake. >> a tough week for presidential candidate newt gingrich began with some conservative blast phy on "meet the press." >> i don't thing right wing social engineering is any more desirable than left wing social engineering. >> his plan didn't go over particularly well with his buddies. >> with guys like that, who needs enemies? >> i won't justify this. >> he was urinating inside the family circle. >> then it got interesting. he was showered with glitter by a protester in new york city. he was chewed out by an iowa voter with a vice grip hand shake. >> why don't you get out before you make a bigger fool of yourself? >> he was questioned about an impossibly large tab at tiffany jewelers. >> i'm not commenting on stuff like that. >> with newt floundering,
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huckabee getting out. >> all the factors say go, but my heart says, no. >> the donald deciding to keep his focus squarely on meat loaf and busy. >> i will not be running for president as much as i'd like to. >> the biggest republican star left standing started to get some ideas about 2012. >> still seriously considering it and praying about it and assessing, yes, the field, looking for others who are ready to go rogue. >> coming up next, we have columnist, bob herbert and donny deutsch and mika has just jetted in from the south of france and will be here as well. unbelieve insights. we'll see all you guys again at 8:00. we'll be back. [ wind howling ]
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it was not a reference to paul ryan. there was no reference to paul ryan in that answer. >> then what did you apologize to him about zbrrchlt. >> because it was interpreted in a way which was causing trouble, which he doesn't need or deserve and it was causing the house republicans trouble. one of my closest friends, somebody i truly respect e-mailed me and said, you know, your answer hits every republican who voted for the budget. my answer wasn't about the budget. i promptly went back and said
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publicly and continued to say, i would have voted for the ryan budget. welcome back to "morning joe." live look at the capitol. ed rendell is still with us, along with the chairman of deutche incorporated, donny deutche. >> hello, darling. look at me. >> als with us at the table, author and former "new york times" columnist and all around great guy. bob herbert, who's a big joe willie namath fan. you said you were star struck. >> i'm usually not star struck. i'm watching you guys, there's joe willie on the wings ready to come on the set and i'm riveted the whole time. the guy is amazing. >> who is more new york? >> i have never asked to have my picture taken with a celebrity, i went up to him and said, can i get my picture taken with you? i was with my publicist, a very
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attractive woman and he wouldn't even look at me. boom. >> are you surprised donny's publicist is an attractive woman? >> am i not going to comment on this? >> you can comment on this. >> no, no. >> wow. >> so newt gingrich, donny deutche, i want you to discipline yourself and not say something hostile or personally abusive about newt gingrich. >> wait a minute, you're going to tell him to be disciplined about newt gingrich? >> exactly. >> i have my discipline suit on. >> now, he's going on rush limbaugh saying i wasn't talking about paul ryan when a clear reading shows he was talking about paul ryan. then why did you apologize to him? at what point do these guys just figure out that the best thing to do is say, i'm sorry, i screwed up, let's move on. >> this is a guy who, in no particular order, fooling around
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on his wife while she was having cancer at the same time, trying to impeach clinton, has not been in public office 20 years, i'm not quite sure what his cr credential is in the first place, a guy we talk about a field of four or five, three people, it's insanity to think this is a credible, even before this episode, this is a credible figure running for office? what does it say about our country and the republican party and to us as co-conspirators we even allow him to run in our public consciousness. >> this guy was not governor of alaska for two years. >> i'm not talking about setting a low bar. >> i'm not being snippy, but bob herbert, you remember, speaker of the house for t the -- republican for the first time in a generation, time's person of the year in 1995, for good reason because nobody shaped events more than newt gingrich more in '94 and '95.
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>> he was briefly a major figure in american politics, no question about that. when you talk about media, he's great copy. the guy has been continually a great story. it's an interesting story. but there's -- it looks to me there's a built in clash between gingrich and the republicans. he cannot stifle himself. and the party more and more demands a rigid adherance to the party line i actually don't think is helpful to the republican party but that's a built-in clash. >> i want to go back to what bob said about good copy. you look at trump and gingrich. >> by the way, you bet your money on trump. >> i owe you a pair of shoes. but this mother, after i came off the set, i said this, you bet he was not going to run, he calls me up and says, quote, bet a million dollar next time, i'm
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running, literally on the phone. told me, said, next time she challenges you, bet a million dollar, i'm running. donald, i'm sure you were shorting it somewhere in vegas. >> what am i doing with the money or shoes, am i getting it? >> you will get the shoes. the point i was making is we have come to a place where everybody puts mitt romney down, dull, boring, you look at everything he's been saying, a credible guy. unless you're a sarah palin or donald trump or newt gingrich, it's not that interesting to talk about so it becomes a self-fulfilling prophesy. >> ed rendell declared the political winner this week, i think, by a landslide, mitt romney. it's as if the clouds have parted. he raised $10 million, by the way, he hasn't embarrassed himself. it's as if the clouds have parted and everybody's realized, wait a second, being dull, being quiet may just be the best
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republican ticket forward. i've heard more positive things about mitt romney this week than i have over the past four years. >> remember, joe, i was on the show about a month ago when that poll came out saying donald was so high. i pointed out among tea partyites, mitt romney was second with fairly substantial, trump was at 21 and mitt was at 19. if tea partyites come to the conclusion he may be their best candidate against barack obama, i think he's got a real shot. >> what about jon huntsman who made a speech in new hampshire yesterday? >> we said earlier, i think huntsman has a bar he can't get over. people don't like you running against your boss. if the boss wasn't any good, why did you hang in there for two years. >> we have a sound bite about that. i want to run it. let's hear what he has to say. jon huntsman. everyone talks about mitt romney winning because all these other guys will peel off and embarrass the party. what about jon huntsman?
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her he is. >> it ill be about whether or not this country is ready for the 21st century and economic competitiveness. it is about those countries that have their economic fundamentals right. we either choose to have a lost decade, which is what japan has done, now, they're going on decade number two that is lost or we can simply get our act together and launch an industrial revolution. >> mika, have you been swept into huntsman mania? >> no. i'm saying, keep your eye on him. >> the great hope for the republican party at this point is going to be somebody that's new, that's fresh, that we haven't seen and that is a big blank page candidate waiting to happen whether huntsman or somebody else that is the alternative to romney. >> a blank page could work if it was simply about his personality, but his name recognition is so low, you
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combine that with the bar the governor was talking about, really, it's hard to see that it would be huntsman. but i do agree that with the republican party, what sort of the suburban and the so-called middle of the road voters are concerned about with the republicans is that the party will nominate one of these crazies. >> by the way, that's just not going to happen. it never happens. >> if the party does it, this thing is not just a walk-off for barack obama. there's a good chance the democrats lose the senate. i think it will be a very interesting election year. >> why do you think that? because a lot of us around the table have been saying the president's looking strong, close to 50%. >> i think the president has been looking strong and i think he has had a really good few weeks with the bin laden thing that was huge and that sort of thing, but, you know, i've been traveling around the country doing the research on this book and talking especially to working people. and for all the things that we talk about in media land, jobs
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jobs jobs is really still the issue. the economy and jobs is what's doing it and if people are still really struggling in 2012, you know, anything can happen in that kind of environment. >> we all know they vote with their pocketbook. i want to go back to obama for a second and you were talking about in the first hour, israel, very interesting before obama was elected. i'm jewish and live in this kind of fund-raising world of wall street. every jew i talked to is very concerned going in, very concerned about this guy, as far as his stature on israel. when fund-raising time comes again and he wants to get to that billion dollars, he has lost a lot of jewish voters right now. i'm not saying that 2% of the population, ed, you come from philadelphia where it's a big community right there, he sent out -- he shot a vote today. i just don't know when it comes fund-raising time, a lot of that moneyed jewish community.
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>> bo and money, he can name his price. >> just say -- why don't we talk about -- mika take us through the news. >> let's look at portion those of speech. president obama delivered a major address on middle east policy to the state department where he spoke extensively about the israel-palestinian conflict and seemed to speak tough to israel. >> as for israel, our friendship is rooted deeply in a shared history and shared values. our commitment to israel security is unshakable. we will stand against attempts to single it out for criticism international forums. but precisely because of our friendship, it's important that we tell the truth. the status quo is unsustainable and israel, too, must act boldly to advance a lasting peace. the borders of israel and palestine should be based on the 1967 lines, with mutually agreed
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swaps, so that secure and recognized borders are established for both states. the palestinian people must have the right to govern themselves and reach their full potential in a sovereign and contiguous state. >> so contrast yesterday's speech with then candidate barack obama in 2008, addressing the american-israel public affairs committee. >> our alliance is based on shared interests and shared values. those who threaten israel threaten us. israel has always faced these threats on the front lines, and i will bring to the white house an unshakable commitment to israel's security. let me be clear, israel security is sacrosanct. it is non-negotiable. the palestinians need a state. the palestinians need a state that is contiguous and cohesive
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and that allows them to prosper. any agreement with the palestinian people must preserve israel's identity as a jewish state, with security recognized defensible borders. and jerusalem will remain the capital of israel and it must remain undivided. >> seriously, jerusalem will remain the capital of israel and it must remain undivided. rendell. compare and contrast. then and now. what happened? >> he was running for office. >> that's just not the truth, is it? >> well -- >> that's just not the truth, is it? >> it's shading the truth. obviously something -- >> well, with what the president told us yesterday, is -- is jerusalem going to be the undivided capital? is that the united states
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position it's the undivided capital of israel? i'm not saying it should or shouldn't, i'm saying let's compare and contrast. >> i don't want to pars it but it depends what you mean by undivided. it will remain in a settlement, under israeli control but new regulations an rules about it now. >> i think -- you know, i was trying to think about this from the president's perspective what he sees as his interests in this. with obama, what you've seen all along, there are two primary, not sole but two primary and one not surprisingly how it works, how something works for him politically, but also, i think he thinks an awful lot about how history is going to view him. i don't think -- i don't think he believes there's going to be a settlement any time soon. he's got this professorial approach to things. he is now on record as to how he thinks the thing should be
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settled, not the beginning of a negotiations, which is not a great negotiating ploy, i don't think he's looking at it as the beginning of a negotiations, i think he's looking at it as him as president being on record, saying this is what should happen. >> putting down a marker? >> yes. >> how did the israelis respond to the marker put down? >> there's a lot of different responses we can gage. i love the slew of republican responses we'll get to in a moment. after yesterday's speeches, israel prime minister benjamin netanyahu called the 1967 lines indefensible saying, quote for peace to endure between israelis and palestinians the viability of a palestinian state cannot come at the expense of the viability of the one and only jewish state. netanyahu is scheduled to meet with president obama at the white house today. >> warm and fuzzy hamas guys going on record saying i want to obliterate the jews as a
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starting negotiating rule i find stunning, i don't understand politically why he's doing it. i'm searching, joe, help me, why is he doing it, maybe your suggestion, i want to go down in history, it's not going to happen. >> i think bob may be right, inside the white house, they're worried about the u.n. vote this fall and maybe they're trying to put a marker down so when they veto the u.n. resolution this fall they don't look so bad. i have to say, you don't have to go back 30 or 40 years to see how the palestinian leaders responded. look at the last four or five years and the palestinian people given the chance at democracy, at moving the palestinian state hood cause forward, what do they do? palestinian people elected hamas. a terrorist organization that still doesn't recognize israel's right to exist, still commits, i believe, acts of bar barrism
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against civilians a week or two ago condemning the killing of their hero, osama bin laden. >> so let's give them a piece of pie. >> i think, if the palestinians want to take a chance for peace, i think we would end up at the 1967 borders. but, again -- to those watching this morning, probably calling this the zionist hour of power, take note that most peop people -- that most people around this table are saying that this -- most foreign policy leaders believe this would be the end point of any negotiations. what is troubling is, this is the beginning point. i think in the long run, ed rendell, we talked about it, this does more to actually hurt the peace process than anything else. putting israel in a corner may make you feel good, may make some professors of middle east
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studies of columbia feel good, it does nothing for the peace process. >> the point joe made earlier, why now? why inject israel in this now, when they're out of it? it's all about the arab spring, everything's going well. why do it now? >> next segment is going to be spoken in hebrew. i'll be leading -- in tel-aviv, we will be giving you -- >> we will be a little different than that. actually dr. zbigniew brzezinski will speak on the president's actions and mark kirk. and up next, david gregory on "meet the press" and eugene robinson will join the conversation. but first -- >> this guy is terrible. this guy is terrible. i saw the extended forecast for next week. guess what? thunderstorms for new york city all next week as well. >> bill, why don't you try
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dentiststry. >> mika is about as close to the sun i've seen lately. >> there you go. if you think that will help you around here. that's a little awkward. >> just a little. one thing that will happen, we get a ton of sun. it will rain everyday. check out the forecast, 60s to 70s in most areas. it is a little warmer but a chance of showers everywhere. check out washington d.c., next week, temperatures jump to the 80s, even a day near 90 next tuesday. things will start feeling more summer-like. forecast in the middle of the country, thunderstorms rolling through oklahoma city. as we go through the weekend, middle of the country, the stormy spot, doing okay on the east coast. sunday, showers and storms not as bad as what we are seeing at the top of the rock. seen better fridays. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. hi, this other store has these for 20 cents less.
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if there's continued stubbornness and no movement, does the u.s. have a role to play to force assad out of power? >> we have taken a series of steps. economic isolation, sanction, we're working very closely with our friends in europe including the turks. we have heard the turks get increasingly assertive as it relates to their expectations for their neighbors in syria. we will continue to play a role. whether your question is whether we intend to intervene, david, there's no discussion of that. >> 92 that was deputy national security advisor dennis mcdonough speaking with "meet the press" david gregory. it can be seen online.
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joining us pulitzer prize winning editor of the "washington post," eugene robinson sfwlchlt go robinson. good to have you here this morning. >> shalom. >> we'll talk about republicans for a minute. obviously, david gregory, all of washington talking about the president's speech yesterday. certainly around this table, we've been debating the president's speech, 1967 borders and whether that's really the place to start the process. how's this going to shape the debate moving forward in d.c.? >> if i can make one point about the sound bite you just heard, where the president spoke and how he speak about syria. today could be an important day in syria how the regime responds to the speech. what you heard from dennis mcdonough, they will not go as far as bashir assad needs to go.
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he needs to go but they will not force him out. a very different strategy we have seen even with regard to egypt. i think we have to put things in context here. it is not unusual for an american president in the past decade or more to frame a peace process around the '67 borders, number one. number two, the administration is doing this in part to try to provide some leverage against a u.n. security council vote to give a palestinian state which israel doesn't want and the united states doesn't want. three, as they talk about the '67 border, some of the other language was important, security guarantees, that's what netanyahu wanted to hear before a state is set up. in transition, a gradual withdraw from a territory as long as there are security guarantees, very important to israel. and finally, land swaps, which means if there are israeli jewish settlements in part of what is the west bank, huge blocks of settlements, those
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would remain in israel's hands. these are all things israel would want. so there are people who are very close, and borders is part of how bill clinton approached this and how george w. bush approached this. >> i guess, then, dpeen, gene, that's the case, then netanyahu and the president are just going to have an absolutely splendid meeting today. i will tell you perhaps they believe that inside the white house, what david just said, perhaps they believe that inside the state department, they do not believe that in israel and supporters of israel do not believe that and the united states. this is a dramatic departure from what presidents have said publicly. symbolically, at least. >> the old approach has been working so well, joe, why don't we just continue it? it's really worked so great over the years. what the president did, i think, was the right thing to do,
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number one, try to frame the issue in a way that shakes things up a bit, that concentrates attention on the issue. number two, enunciate a policy -- this is a changing ddle east. enunciate a policy that best suits u.s. interests in a region that is changing more rapidly than any of us understand. >> so why do it now? why do this now in israel. you say shake things up. you mockingly said things have been going so well in the past, at the same time, though, do we have a partner in palestine? when you have elected leaders of the palestinian people saying that the killing of osama bin laden was a bad thing? >> no, we don't. as a matter of fact -- >> so why do it now. >> the president called out the palestinians on hamas. just as he called out the israelis on the '67 borders. he called out everybody in the region by name on their
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transgressions and failings and essentially said, everybody shape up. but what is in israel's best interests, and if you believe, as i think the president believes, and as many people believe, it is in israel's best interests, long term interests, demographically, just in terms of israel's continued prosperity and existence, it is better to have a two-state solution. you need to say that. i think people are receptive in the long term -- >> i will challenge one thing. i think if you took a tour of israel, you would not find that is the public sentiment. people who are worried about their existence going forward, to joe's point, where we're basically saying to these palestinians, you know what, guy, yeah, you hamas folks, you drift in that direction, let's go. let's party together. i have a feeling our view here, as we sit and kind of analyze
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and i'd delize, if you travel that region, i don't think you would find that. >> i have traveled that region. i know things look different over the next hill, however, take the longer view. you know, no, you can't move forward until hamas is somehow either gotten out of the government or brought into the fold, at least the fold that accepts israel's existence, clearly, you can't move forward until then. where do you want to go? where do you eventually want to get to. >> david gregory. >> i want to make a point here. joe, i disagree. this is not just the view of the white house in terms of what they think israel ought to accept, this also reflects prominent views within israel that this speech was actually good news for the israeli government for some of the points already laid out here.
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probably saying that the 'squelch borders would be a framework for a peace process. will certainly ruffle feathers and not what netanyahu wants. but that's different than saying that's what's actually been the predicate for negotiations going back a dozen years and should be what any israeli leader should actually expect and leavened by some of the other statements the president made with regard to hamas and imposing a u.n. vote on palestinian statehood and land swaps making sure states stay in israel hands. you look at the reaction on the right among presidential candidates, it's as if they have forgotten the path followed by the bush administration on a peace process admittedly was not moving anywhere and came close to moving the ball to really moving the needle under the clinton administration. this is the same reality negotiators have been operating under for some time and create. there's language in here that
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reflects the reality and the question about whether there is a legitimate partner in peace among the palestinians. i think, again, according to people i talked to, there is some leverage being created here for the administration, not to use against the israelis but to also use against europeans and even arabs who say, you know, look, the president is giving too much to israel. >> obviously, we talked about earlier, on the minds of a lot of people inside the white house and the state department, is the u.n. vote coming up this fall, david. this is seen as leverage obviously for that. we've talked about that. you said, this is also seen as good news for some in israel. what major israeli public figures have come out supporting the president's speech? >> i don't think there have been major public figures that have. some of the commentary coming out of the commentary in the press and others looking at the situation, are recognizing some of these factors diplomatically are actually positive for
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netanyahu. >> gene, obviously, this comes among the backdrop of a very terrible relationship, a terrible relationship with netanyahu, and president obama. he's coming to the white house today. do we expect -- what do you expect to see. >> my rule on the middle east is what do you expect to see and then go the other way. have tea and cookies and come out smiling and shaking hands. >> you never know, do you, bob herbert? again, this is something we've seen time and time again, where you think that there's going to be an impasse and something happens that creates just the opposite. >> you don't know. but the thing i always think about, there is a view in washington, there are views within the media, but then, gene spoke to this, there's a certain view of the people involved,
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whether they're the israelis living in israel, whether the palestinians and netanyahu with his political bags that he brings to the table and all that becomes a factor in what's going on. >> it does. >> david gregory, thank you. be sure to catch meet the press this sunday for david's exclusive guest, house budget charm, paul ryan. >> david, you're looking forward to that, a great follow-up to last week's "meet the press." >> medicare, whether it's a litmus test to the republican party. because of what newt gingrich did on "meet the press" last sunday is front and center. >> david, don't trick ryan like you did newt gingrich. shame on you! >> a big show coming up. thank you, david. a big show coming up on monday. war correspondent, sebastian younger, oh, i have to see "limitless" this weekend, i
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promised him and actor billy crudup and bradley cooper. and reexamining the 1982 tylenol poisonings. remember that? do they already have their man sitting in super max prison? we'll tell you who the new suspect may be. [ male announcer ] look outside. it's grow time.
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welcome back to "morning joe." a live look at the white house. the sun coming up over washington. it's actually sunny there. that's nice. a quick look at the news for you. i know, weird. >> what's that? >> i don't know what that is. after five days in custody, dominique strauss-kahn will leave the confines of a rikers island jail cell today and begin a defense -- >> watch out, women, he's on the move. he and mike barnicle in central park the same day. >> judge granted the former imf chief bail after his defense team argued he's not a flight
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risk. in exchange for his release, strauss-kahn must put up $1 million cash bail and $5 million insurance bond and agree to electronic and video surveillance at his manhattan apartment, along with an armed guard 24 hours a day. strauss-kahn will return to court for arraignment hearing on june 6th. the fbi is investigating whether ted kosinski, the so-called euunabomber was sforn the 1982 tylenol poisoningings. ca z kaczynski denied any involvement in the case. seven people died after taking tylenol bottles laced with potassium cyanide. coming up next.
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dr. zbigniew brzezinski and we'll be back with much more on "morning joe." long before a cummins diesel engine powered a ram truck..
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welcome back to "morning joe." 42 past the hour. joining us now from washington, former national security advisor for president carter dr. zbigniew brzezinski good morning. >> good morning, mika. >> the "wall street journal" today i think underlines the problems with middle east peace more than anything. they have three or four quotes highlighted. half of the quotes say the president threw israel under the bus and the other half say they threw the palestinians under the bus. what did you hear yesterday?
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>> i thought i heard a speech which was trying to initiate movement on the peace process, the peace process that is stalemated, but a rather timid initiative, in my mind, as a result, is not likely to modernize the kind of international support needed to move the process forward. i think we are going to have peace in the middle east, if we are, we have to face two basic fundamental realities. first of all, the parties to the conflict, israelis and palestinians will never resolve it by themselves. the differences between them are just not bridgeable by themselves. and, secondly, the issue in the middle east is not the just security for israel or rights for the palestinians, it's also fundamental american national interests. and that has to guide american policy.
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so i approve of what the president did, but i wish he had gone further, because if he had, he would have been able to mobilize much more support from among the israelis, palestinians and the international community. >> what would the president need to say that would have at advanced america's interests in that region more effectively? >> address all of the issues and not simply point to the '27 frontier fro -- -- -- '67 frontiers for departure which it has to be and some of the other issues have to be addressed, what is the balance between them. the question of jerusalem, in what manner can it be shared so that the interests of both sides are preserved. how do you deal with the question of security? how do you provide security for israel? for example, perhaps nato or american forces on the jordan river, so that israel feels secure without wanting to occupy
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large pieces of palestine. these are the kind of issues that have to be addressed head-on. if the united states doesn't do it, it won't work and we just single out one point for emphasis, obviously, they will get a lot of resentment and arguments against it. >> "washington post" gene robinson is here with a question. >> dr. brzezinski, hasn't a lot of that been in the air some time, the question of jerusalem, could be claimed as a capital by both sides and you could sort of fudge the divisions? is the point the president needed to say this out loud in a public forum or are there do you think genuinely new initiatives and ideas he could bring to the table? >> look, there are a lot of ideas already floating around, like the geneva accords which were reached between a group of responsible israelis, not governmental people and responsible palestinians. my point is that unless you go
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forward with something which gives all the parties a sense that in the end, the elements put together give each at least their required minimum, you're always going to find obstacles. for example, the president yesterday said the point of departure has to be the '67 lines. in fact, there's nothing new in that but because it hasn't said so formally, everybody immediately concentrates on that and netanyahu comes out and says he rejects it. if he rejects it, what does he have in mind. in fact, you have the map here on your program earlier, which does show what he has in mind. he really has in mind a couple of -- kind of basuto land settlements for the palestinians on the west bank, surrounded all the way around in each case by israeli territory. that's not a solution. the old palestinian mandate has a population in it, which is
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slightly more than half israeli, almost half palestinian or arab. several million in each side, 6, 7 million in one, close to 6 million in the other. the '67 lines provide for 78% of that land go to israel, 22% of that land to go to the palestinians. if the palestinians share is going to be diminished even further, what is there left for them? put your map on the screen and you will see what i'm talking about. this is the kind of issue that has to be addressed in a comprehensive fashion, that is to say, what are the security arrangements? how is jerusalem shared? what do we mean by right of return? what are the fundamental requirements of israel to secure the international community can assure, plus demille tarization in the palestinian state. a package could mobilize international support and really then mobilize those israelis,
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who according to public opinion polls in the majority favor a compromise, to speak up. the same is true on the palestinian side. the palestinians have to know what the end result is going to be before they engage. so it was a good step forward and i feel sort of sorry for the president because i know he means well and he want to do something but it was just a little too timid for me, and i think as a consequence, he's going to now have strong opposition from netanyahu and quasi-silence from those in israel who favor a compromise and some palestinians will be probably disillusioned. >> i wonder if more could happen behind the scenes with netanyahu. i wanted to point out did you see t.j. listened to my father when he said put up the map. you should try a polish accent. >> mike is here with a question. mike. >> doctor, you have been in the oval office with the president of the united states and israel prime minister.
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today, president netanyahu will be in the office with president obama. according to all antidotal evidence we hear, it is an extremely frosty relationship. what would you hope for this president of the united states to come away from this private oval office meeting with the rhetorical pushing and shoving that will probably go on? what would you like to see come out of that meeting, >> what i would like to see is something i'm pretty sure i won't see, which is some movement towards an agreement. i think netanyahu's response to this relatively modest proposal of the president's is so negative, i don't have too much optimi optimism. the point has to be recognized is this. the president can only influence the course of events if he leads decisively. at one point, you mentioned the previous president and he had a rather frosty relationship also with a rather conservative israeli prime minister was engaged. at one point, he sent me to the senate and had me ask the two
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senate leaders, the democratic one, senator byrd, the republican one, senator baker, would they support him if he had a confrontation with the prime minister of israel and minister of israel. and independent of each other gave me the same answer. they said in the president leads, since he speaks for the national interests, since he articulates the requirements of our national security, i will support him. if he doesn't lead, of course i'll not support him. i think that reality still prevails. >> but doctor, this is ed rendell. don't you think that was a, a different time and b, we weren't on the threshold of a presidential election? when you look at the republican reaction to the president's speech, i think that's sort of a pipe dream. i agree the president should lead, but m i'm not sure this is the best time to lead. >> he can only lead if he has
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something truly in a comprehensive sense. if the president came out with a brush package, the entire international community would support him and public opinion polls show majority of israelis and palestinians would support him. those israeli leaders critical of netanyahu would speak up. even though the public and the majority supports a compromise solution. >> so, you think the president should have laid out specifically all the details? what security for israel meant. things like that should be laid out in the speech? >> at least some articulation of the key elements. what does it mean. how specified and means not to israel because we can't expect israel to commit suicide for the sake of the ref gees. sharing of jerusalem.
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there is a large portion of jerusalem which arab and has been so for centuries. there are proposals for how communities could have their respective capitals without dividing the city even. some special arrangement for the religious sides. there is the question of the militarization of the palestinian state. the question of international security guarantees. a package like that, i think would have more appeal than focusing on just one issue, even though the president is technically right, that the 67 frontiers other point of departure for equitable swaps. >> thanks, dad. thanks for coming on. coming up, illinois senator mark kirk will be here onset. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. aaah!
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before you buy a used car, get a carfax vehicle history report. see accidents and service reported to carfax and a price based on the car's history. free, at thousands of reputable dealers. just say, show me the carfax. the borders of israel and palestine should be based on the swaps so th secure and recognized borders are established for both states. the palestinian people must have
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the right to govern themselves and reach their full potential in a sovereign and contiguous state. >> good morning. it's 8:00 a.m. on the east coast as you take a live, miserable look at new york city. mike barnicle, ed rendell, richard haas. we called you after the speech yesterday and wanted to get you in here because the president -- i'll let you characterize what the president did yesterday regarding israel and pre-1967 borders. >> he used formulations that had never been precisely used before. he said things explicitly that people knew implicitly. you could do a textural and look at everything he said, what he didn't say, what's good for the
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israelis, palestinians. the other is to take a step back and say how much of this reaction to the speech is not so much about the speech, but about what came before the speech and about the relationship. i think that's actually closer to the truth thachlt again, there was not some new things. the israelis didn't like what they heard. palestinians liked what they didn't hear. one of those typical speeches. too much for some and not enough for the others. about a relationship that has never quite gelled between barack obama and netanyahu. israelis felt jammed. this wasn't what they were expecting and all the build-up to the netanyahu visit. he meets with the president in a couple of hours. they found out about it a day before. they pushed back. so what you have is a sense of a relationship that is meant to be built both on trust and it's not quite there. so that explains some of the
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vitriol in the statement that came out, which was an angry statement. netanyahu had a choice. he could have cherry picked those parts of the speech he likes. particularly the parts that challenged fatah and hamas. how are you a credible negotiating partner? you've got to answer that question because hamas rejected the existence of the state of israel. why don't you try to answer that? so netanyahu could have answered that and chose not to. instead, essentially went through the speech with all the things that gave him heartburn. it's hard to imagine a worse lead-in. >> i've got to say, governor, when you start at what most people would consider the finishing point, and you -- you tell the palestinians, we're going to give you back everything you lost in 1967 when
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israel was attacked, i just don't see upside for israel here. >> it's not a very good negotiating strategy. what i think the president was trying to do was inject life into negotiations. he was trying take advantage of the wave of feeling that's going across the arab world right now. was it a good bargaining strategy? you're right, joe, probably not. >> what do the israelis have to give up? again, as richard said, i don't think think of this as an end point would shock a lot of foreign policy experts, beginning point for u.s. foreign policy? the stated official u.s. foreign policy? i'm sorry, that's shocking. >> yeah. >> i actually disagree. i think you're slightly overdoing it. we all know if there's an agreement, there's going to be two states. israel and palestinian. the idea it's based on the 67
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lines with land swaps and the swaps would be for two reasons. for security reasons. there would have to be adjustments in the border and adjustments for demographic reasons to take into account the three large settlement blocks. the devils would be in the details in negotiations. >> you think i'm overdoing it, talking about 1967, the president of the united states -- that is not politically feasible. like saying -- no, excuse me. >> that's not what it says. zbr. >> it's the basis for negotiation. >> he's not saying you go back to the 67 lines full stop. he's saying the basis, basibasi with land swaps. it's a different formulation. formulations in the middle east have consequences. particularly in a relationship that's not good, but he said explicitly, what everybody has argued implicitly, which is
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you're going to have a negotiation with that framing point and the detail and details matter. >> it's a little bit like a labor negotiation. if you're the government, you don't come in and say to the union, this is what we want and have that as the actual thing that you want. you have to set the stage. you have to leave some wiggle room. if this was event chul negotiating statement, it's a good place to be. your point, joe, if you're going to start negotiations, you leave a little room. >> what have the palestinians done over the last eight years other than elect hamas? >> i think you've just said it. the palestinians have gone in the wrong direction, not the right direction. >> why are we rewarding them? >> i'm a little bit with these guys. i think what the president has
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said, it's a starting point, not ending point. but i think put this in a broader context, first of all, there's a lot going on in the middle east. i think the president felt the need to say something constructive to help us in a broader way. the second thing that struck me about this just to bring it home for a second, it's kind of remarkable, actually, that the president got at this point, close to an election year and made a speech which was not going to be well received by the american people. at a time when he's trying raise his billion dollars. >> seriously, it's what he did in 2008. let's look at this 2008 speech the president delivered to apac. >> our alliance is based on shared interest and shared values. those who threaten israel threaten us. israel has always faced these
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threats on the front lines and i will bring the white house an unshakable commitment to israel's security. now, let me be clear, israel's security is sack row sant. it is nonnegotiable. the palestinians need a state that is contiguous and cohesive and that allows them to prosper, but any agreement with the palestinian people must preserve israel's identity as a jewish state with secure, recognized, defensible borders and jerusalem will remain the capital of israel and it must remain undivided. >> oh, wait, mike barnicle, he didn't do that. in fact, he sounded a little like mort zucker man. >> but it appears, joe, rereading the speech last night, that the speech basically is the
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bush doctrine with verbs. it's not that dissimilar from the bush doctrine set up by president bush several years ago and he gives the speech in the context of a new middle east. a new north africa and he's a different president. he's not george w. bush and we've been emphasizing whether he has thrown too much on the table, but if you again go over the speech again, there's a strong and explicit warning to hamas and fatah. you know, they are not going to -- israelis are not going to negotiate with you until you recognize their right to exist. if you don't do that, there's not a process. so he's trying to jump-start a process. >> he's not so much trying to jump-start a process because i think there's no chance of process, he's trying to head off with the administration fears as a train wreck this september in
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the u.n. they wanted to put town this challenge to hamas and fatah and essentially put something out there so people don't jam israel in the general assembly this september. but i think there's a larger issue issue. why did he give this speech now? i'm not sure it was a good idea. i'm not sure this made a lot of sense. this is in the context of the so-called arab upheavals, israel has not been front and center. there's probably not a lot you can do. >> we've talked about this repeatedly, one of the striking things about the protests in the middle east and north africa, you haven't seen american flags burning, you haven't seen israeli flags burning. i don't know if this is necessary when the president already has such bad standing, i don't know how this moves the peace process forward. i think it strengthens the hard liner's hand and netanyahu's
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hand. he has made a political enemy of netanyahu and that's not going to change. >> that's the tactics of the speech as opposed to the linear analysis. why put this in, particularly when the arabs read the speech, they said, hey, where's the process. george mitchell resigns. >> why did mitchell resign? because he knew this was coming? >> the word on the street is he resigned not because he thought the speech was too much but because he thought it was too little. for months, there has been a battle within the mrks. but you got yesterday if you will, the half monte, not the full monte. mitchell reportedly wanted more than this. and after the hamas, fatah agreement, this is all the president was willing to do. >> you know, one of the more interesting elements of this,
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underlying element, is there a hint within the speech of perhaps a marshal plan for north africa and the middle east, but basically, the president saying we'd like to do this, but the europeans and the united states, we don't have a whole lot of money to do it. it's kind of an interesting subplot. >> forgive a billion dollars in debt when a country is over $25 billion in debt. it's a modest amount. connects to a lot of conversations we have. it's hard to be a great power. >> before we move to break, let's go into another part of the speech that was fascinating. the president called out fren and foe alike. whether it was syria or yemen or bahrain. certainly is not -- stayed away from the saudis, but the saudis certainly were not happy when he started talking about bahrain and other countries along the
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peninsula weren't happy as well. >> i think the president was under a lot of pressure to articulate this region. it was at the end of the speech and there was a lot of stuff before that in which we tried to lay out his vision, but i think his vision is a very pragmatic one. you got to take your shots. make arguments all you want about sierra being as bad as libya, but you've got to deal in the real world in terms of what's possible. i think he was trying to work his way through that. >> let's talk the politics of it. republicans attacking the president for what he said. i would do the same thing. there are a lot of people who certainly over the last decade, at least since 2000, who have said, what have the palestinians done? why are we pushing the israelis more in the corner?
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let's talk the political impact. would you be putting your arms around barack obama today with this speech? >> it's very hard. that's the curious part. if in fact it were close to closure, we could say, take the political risk because sometimes you've got to do what's right above and beyond politics. in 2008, apac convention was in philadelphia. about ten days before the primary. i got to speak as governor and i brought a guest along with me. that was hillary clinton. she wasn't allowed to speak, but i recognized her and the place went wild. in part, pro hillary -- >> if fear of barack obama. >> as we enter in election cycle, the president deserves credit for doing this. but why now when there doesn't appear to be chance for closure? >> i don't see this moving us closer to peace.
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i see this actually cornering the israelis more and making peace at least in the short-term more unlikely. >> i think it goes back to what richard said though. this israelis are under increasing pressure from all around the world. you've got this vote coming up in the fall and i think the president felt he had to do something to establish a line of last defense. >> can you think of any european ally, maybe the president will be proven right here, he knows a lot more than i do right now behind the secenes talking to allies. >> the timing of this is linked to the president's upcoming tour to europe. again, i think it's not going to be in it for them. obviously too much for the israelis. up next, senator mark kirk joins the conversation and later, he was the first inductee to baseball's hall of fame. played in a record 24 all-star
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games and was a three-time mvp and yet, some still consider him underrated. a closer look at stan the man with george veszy. but first, here's bill karins. >> i thought you were going to say i was underrated, too. your weekend forecast starting with the rain this morning. throughout the morning, this is going to translate into the philadelphia, new york area. this pesky storm is the one that's been lingering over us all week long. maybe some breaks in the clouds, but cloudy with showers and storms this afternoon. the other problem spot. lot of bad weather through oklahoma, thunderstorms are widespread. dallas, you'll get those later today. the middle of the country, the worst of it today and into saturday, it's this region in here that's going to deal with the best chance of showers and storps and as we get into sunday, it gets a little better. atlanta, 91, d.c., 87.
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one of the warmest periods for the east coast is coming up towards the end of the weekend. [ manager ] you know... i've been looking at the numbers, and i think our campus is spending too much money on printing. i'd like to put you in charge of cutting costs. calm down. i know that it is not your job. what i'm saying... excuse me? alright, fine. no, you don't have to do it. ok? [ male announcer ] notre dame knows it's better for xerox to control its printing costs. so they can focus on winning on and off the field. [ manager ] are you sure i can't talk -- ok, no, i get it. [ male announcer ] with xerox, you're ready for real business. hey, dad, think i could drive? i'll tell you what -- when we stop to fill it up. ♪ ♪
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you have been called the brodey genre of congress. i've also learned from tmz that you have six-pack abs. any truth to that? >> well -- >> it's simple question. >> as soon as as i say that and then i get out of shape, you're going to use it against me. >> you're implying that i am so
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taken with you right now that i will be upset. you're just implying that i'm going to stay obsessed with your abs, sir, and yes, i'm not saying there's no chemistry here, but i'm keeping it professional and i want you to do the same. >> that was aaron shocky. did you see his layout? >> yes. very impressive. he was on our show a month ago, less than impressed. >> next senator has an eight-pack. >> joining us now, senator mark kirk along with donny deutsch back at the table. are you going to be doing a photo spread shirtless? >> never. >> okay. just wondering. i guess these days, you have to ask. let's talk about the gang of six falling apart. tom coburn pulled out of the group this week. do you think that in some way, shape or form, there can be some sort of proposal that works out of this group?
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>> it should. i'll make a little news today. i think the gang of six should be the gang of six again. i hope senator rob portman joins with his connections to the omb and his gravtous. the hopes of the senate fixing the 4 to $5 trillion prb rests on this group because i think they offer the best chance to put together a plan based on the bipartisan deficit commission report to handle this that would reassure americans, employers, u.s. allies and those who lend money to the u.s. government. >> i thought tom coburn was a huge loss. one, because of what he did on the deficit commission. two, because he clearly has the guts. he took on norquist, plus, he's a great guy who cares about this country. i was saddened to see that. >> he was. the initial magic of the game,
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coburn and durbin both voted for the bipartisan report. we had a tremendous deficit like this right after world war two and because we had fiscal conservative leaders, we paid off those huge deficits that unlocked the economy that became the superpower called the united states of america. it's that kind of fiscal discipline we need again. so what would a portman edition bring? will we have that announcement? >> i talked to rob about this yesterday and i think he's red sent and needs to be invited into this group, but he is the kind of person who could give grav i tas to this discussion again. it's unfortunately geithner gave us the may 16th deadline, then
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sent ut another letter saying it was august 2nd. you could feel the energy going out of the deficit reduction tires and heading for a july battle instead of a may battle. we're resetting the battlefield for june, july, with the gang of six, gang of five, being the best act in town. >> if you do your grocery shopping or get your gas in the morning, you get the sense that most people in the country understand this need to reduce spending and take a whack at the deficit, but you also get the sens inning from a lot of people that they understand equally there's a need to increase the revenue stream. that at some point, we're going to have to do something about the tax structure, eliminate the bush tax cuts. >> i think the bipartisan commission report is by far the most important document in washington. i've read ever page. if you have not read every page of that report, you are out of
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step with where congress is going. that's a mixture of revenues and cuts. it's got about 3 trillion in cuts and 1 trillion in revenues. it's a politically sustainable amount that could get through the house of representatives, but it depends on will. it depends on the white house not undercutting this group and it depends on we republicans supporting its work. >> so on a specific issue to pick up mike's point, i'm that 1%. the very wealthy one americans who's happy to pay my share of taxes. it's fair, it's right. do you think not it's not right for somebody like me, who has millions of millions of dollars? i want yes or no on that. >> i am not in washington to raise taxes and sock it to the rich and have some failed politics that the american people have flirted with and totally rejected at the polls.
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but if there is a balanced plan along the simpson bowles line that will lower the rates. remember, the plan wipes out a lot of the deductions. not home mortgages. bringing us down to 28 to 23% tax rates. the economy will take off as it has in many other countries when they've had a reform like that, as it has in 1986. class warfare cannot work. >> you're saying if corporations for instance, that pay 17% taxes and people like warren buffett who pay 12 or 13%, you say if they get taxed more, the economy's going to tank? >> you're going in the class warfare -- >> i'm trying to get this deficit thing and i'm saying one of the moves is these absurd loophol loopholes. >> i would say the president has laid out a corporate tax reform plan, which is very good. the president knows, especially
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michael dell, the other high-tech guys, the united states cannot have the second highest corporate taxes on earth. that is a huge incentive to leave the united states. the president has put forward a plan in concept to wipe out a lot of the deductions and lower the corporate tax rate. if we set a goal of setting a corporate rate that is slightly below or economic competitors, then all of the multinational corporations have an incentive to base their headquarters in the united states, not to go abroad as they do now. >> you know that our tax -- isn't close to what the effective tax rate is. you know how many percent pay no tax at all? 34%. >> friends of president like ge somehow have paid no tax. >> it's not just ge. it's 34%. it's wrong and we've got to
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change it. zb. >> but you guys are very much on the raise taxes front. >> pay taxes, not raise them. pay taxes! >> both on the individual and corporate side is to wipe out all of the special interest loopholes. really death for k street and a number of special interest provisions being wiped out so that both corporate and individual rates calm down. you end up with a fatter, a flatter, fairer tax in which economic decisions rather than special interest decisions guide the economy and i think you'll have the same result that you have in the past. >> so, can you -- i'm the dope here. he's a billionaire and he's a smart guy, a politician. mika, how is it class politics when you just take the tax code and go back? >> because a lot of people -- >> class politics. >> a lot of people want to hit the u.s. economy with yet
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another increase. remember, we had ten tax increases in the health care bill alone. we have enormous uncertainly because i think all of the regulations of the health care bill and financial control bill inject a lot of capital sitting off on the side of this economy. we can't have another discussion about socking this economy with another huge tax increase. if we do that, then other countries will take up. remember, as the japanese lower their corporate tax rate, we will then have the highest corporate tax rates on earth. >> all right. we don't have agreement here, but everyone got a chance to talk. >> talk them out back and smack them around. >> senator mark kirk, thank you very much. i'm looking forward to your self magazine profile. it's going to be good. they do it in your state. up next, business before the bell. we're going to talk to aaron shock.
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let's get a check of business before the bell with the great mark haines. he's live at new york's stock exchange. what's going on today?
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>> it's joe. >> joe. >> joe! i'm glad you're here. i need your help. >> okay. >> i need your help. i'm making a list of stuff i need for my trip to heaven tomorrow and you know, there are obvious things like clean underwear and socks, but do you think i'll need tooth paste? >> i don't think so. i don't think personal hygiene -- i think you get one of those little things when you check in. >> maybe a travel size just to be on the safe side. >> i might take abbey road. pick the cd of your choice. this of course prums that you will of course be going up, one of the chosen ones raptured tomorrow. >> true. which is, i will admit, extremely unlikely. >> i don't know about that. but i do know this, that i was just wondering about this, mark haines, because this is a business segment.
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what is this guy, where's the front page of "the new york times"? because this guy is on the front page of "the new york times" with his family. -- what do you do when sunday comes and it -- and we're still streaming out to fenway to see the red sox play? what's your next act? >> boy, that's kind of embarrassing, isn't it? >> i guess it is. >> i guess you know the whole he'll come like a thief in the night doesn't apply to this guy. >> let me ask you this, mark haines, we're short on time. this thing seems like a pang to me. like losers asking to join their lincoln whatever and yet they've got this huge ipo. who is investing in this? >> happy days are here again --
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it's bubble, what else?mania. >> i said it yesterday on the air and thought i was going to be assassinated. this is a bubble and you will see, facebook will come public and sell for a gazillion dollars. >> so much cash on the sidelines, they have nowhere to go. >> this is 1999 all over again. >> part likely it's 1999. invest in pets.com. mark haines, we love you. >> you're adorable. >> futures, let's do at least a little bit of news. futures are indicating a lower open. have a great weekend. have a great weekend, see you in heaven on sunday. >> all right, baby. >> bye, mark. thanks to the venture card from capital one,
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billions could come in blinding bursts, hitting five home runs in a single day's doubleheader, leading the league in singles, doubles, triples and rbis over the single season. three world series. first ballot hall of famer worthy of one of the greatest nicknames in sports. stan the man. >> that was president obama back in february awarding the presidential metdal to stan musial. joining us now, george vecsey. good to have you on board this morning. >> good morning. nice to be here. my wife's favorite program. >> thank you. >> thank you so much. we love that. >> you know, i mean, this is such a pleasure. stan musial, such a mobile human being. i am struck, george, in this
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book as well as other recounting of stan, how much he came to be widely admired as a human being within baseball and a baseball player. >> you can't fool people in your hometown, where you're playing. i was in st. louis last week and every place i went, i got this look of a semisecular icon. almost a religious ferver. the life he had, the career he had in st. louis. people just adored him. i grew up in queens, close to brooklyn and as we say in brooklyn, he used to mortar us. >> we were discussing at 6:00, which seems like about three days ago, but 6:00, that as great as stan musial was, he doesn't seem to be regarded in the very top tier of baseball stars and yet his career, he should have earned that. >> the numbers are there even
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now. he's still in the top ten in a number of things. obviously, players come along, records are made to be broken. the real issue is whether his personality got in the way of that. whether he was too nice. whether that's our fault or his. whether deimagine owe's haughtyness or temperment, i think i used the word, sexier. those guys attracted the attention. >> and mickey mantle beyond that. jane levy's recent book. the bad boy who had secrets. musial had no secrets. he is what he is. family man, kids in a typical midwestern town. he is sort of the eisenhower years -- >> the eisenhower of baseball. >> you look at his numbers though, a lot say he may be the second or third greatest player
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of all time behipd babe ruth and yet when the fans voted a few years ago, he didn't make the list. >> it was a punch out computer thing where fans in the ballpark were voting and if you were 25 or 30 in 1999 and somebody gives you a card -- those are the four active players who got voted on and i submit none of those four players would be necessarily voted on today just by the passage of time. bonds will get more attention than some of them. >> where do you place him? >> i'm going to quote my old budly from louisville, kentucky. he came up with the list of the team you put out there to save civilization. if the bad guys were coming in from outer space and you had to
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send out nine people, he put musial in left field. koufax was the pitcher. mus musial was on that team and i'll go along with that. dave's always right. the most amazing statistic in his career was what he said. triples. led the league in triples. wasn't a very fast runner. they call him the greyhound and he did have some speed in the early days. he's a depression era slim guy. you could see his ribs, his sternum. people didn't eat a lot in the '20s and '30s, he could run. after the war, you can't run as much, but he came out of the box in those days. in those days, he was a left-handed hitter. >> moving. >> flying. >> heading to second base as
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opposed to the paragons today who admire their handy work. >> you mentioned the, you know, team to save civilization and you're still getting it done for the new york city new york city. couple of times a week. >> thank you. >> and stan musial, unfortunately, ted williams, for too many ballplayers today, they don't know who these players are. they have no memory of their own game. it's so disappointing. >> there's so much information for anybody. i don't care what field they're in. so many signals coming at them from different angles and ballplayers today, there are no record books because they're all online and when they go online, there's other things. >> how does musial do if he's 25 years old and the big leagues today? just add good? >> sure. hand, eye coordination, how would he do? he might make a little bit more money. >> lefty was in san francisco in mid-1970s, ran a bar, great
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pitcher. what would ted williams hit if herp in the big leagues today and said .290,.295. yeah but you got to remember, he's 74 today. >> ted never could run and it didn't matter. >> he could hit the ball. >> thank you so much. the book -- good to have you on the show. >> thank you and thank your wife for watching the show and your daughter for putting up with ed rendell. >> can i say this? she misses him. on a personal level. >> we'll be right back. s lenses. s lenses. transitions adapt to changing light so you see a whole day comfortably and conveniently while protecting your eyes from the sun. ask your eyecare professional which transitions lenses are right for you. female announcer: thanks to the eyeglass guide, it's never been easier to find the right pair of eyeglasses.
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today's a very special day for us. of course, the day before the rapture. let's go to dave. >> everywhere -- >> come here, bring gelman out. >> 20 years this guy's been doing this show. this is the first time that chris lick has been on the show. why do they give him makeup? >> i was surprised to see him in the makeup room. >> a very unmanly thing to do, isn't it? >> ran out of makeup. ♪ >> for all purposes, me. >> some people from syracuse, she should not get a degree from any school.
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>> we can blame, sir, our executive producer, chris lick, for running that piece. >> these are good, decent, steady men that don't go around flipping people off or screaming [ bleep ] you at the top of their lungs. i suggest -- maybe we should just check out our -- okay? >> no, no-, no. >> does it work? >> it does, but we do not have to text it. -- good friend, member of the family, a few days ago as he was leaving the studio had massive blood on the back of his head, i think he may have done that, just to get away from me. >> had a headache, went to the
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hospital and had brain bleeding. just another day on the show. >> i got in the car -- >> it was the worst headache of my life. i couldn't really describe it. like nothing i had felt before. >> come on over here. let's sing happy birthday to chris. hey, chris, i' be honest with you, we didn't know if we were going to make it to this birthday with you, that whole brain hemorrhage thing -- >> thank you. second birthday i've spent here. ♪ >> chris's baby. and he listened to the entire interview with the good senator. >> andrew has made more sense -- his hair. >> might have noticed, our executive producer not been in the control room the last couple of days. here's why. 7:50 a.m. today, ryan christopher.
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♪ >> chris, thank you for being with us. greatly appreciate it. ♪ >> mike bharn barnicle, we're going to miss him. >> end of an era. era. >> no doubt about it. >> chris, vegas, baby. that's all i'm saying, brother. >> good luck, but not too much. >> mika? >> how do we make this about us? you're good at that. you know what we call him, our friend. >> our friend. >> i think most of you have seen the story, chris is going to be leaving us today and heading over to cbs.
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going to be vice president over there. now, we call him mr. vice president. he helped us create this show as we were driving through the tunnel at 3:30 in the morning and for that, we will forever be grateful, not as grateful as the fact we don't have to wake up at 3:30 and go through lincoln tunnel anymore. but good luck. thank you so much. >> we'll miss you. >> this is as good as it's going to get. >> thank you, guys. i'm glad you said that. it all really goes downhill from here. i said that when i graduated from college. >> you guys are in very good hands. >> what's that? >> you know the end of the last episode of mary tyler moore, where she shuts off the lights. >> could do that in the background.

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